Friday, April 10, 2009

VE175 LCD monitor repair

I sold something on eBay and had some money to spare. I also needed a LCD monitor for a friend so I placed a minimum bid on some LCD screens that needed repair. To my surprise I won several auctions! So hopefully I will be posting repair tips for several of these monitors over the next few days.

Up first is a Viewsonic VE175. The picture comes on for a second and then goes out. I opened up the monitor expecting that the power supply had bad caps in it but that was not the case. The bad caps were on the control board. There are 5 of them that needed to be replaced. They are the bigger ones that are bulging at the top. One of them even has stuff oozing out of it. Most of them can be replaced with 1000 uF 16 volt capacitors, you will need some 470 uF 25 volt caps too. You can almost always use a slightly larger value or higher voltage capacitor.


If you have never replaced motherboard or power supply capacitors before you will need to know some tricks. First you need to add fresh solder to get the heat to travel through the board to remove the old capacitor. Second use a tiny screwdriver to clean out the holes for the new capacitor.

4 comments:

ZeljkoH said...

Hello...

I had same problem. But still it switches off after I replaced capacitors. I found out that one of the lamps is bad and return voltage is not present (3,5Vdc). In that case - when it does not lit and return voltage stays 0, inverter PWM chip switches off after 1 second. So problem is in the backlight lamp also!

Cameron Wieght said...

Your blog was excellent. I am waiting for more to see in your blog...really its very informative. Monitor Repair Toronto

Nitesh Pathak said...

Hello ZeljkoH
I think its not capacitor problem click on this link you will get a solution.The same problem happened with me.
http://tvrepairnavimumbai.com/lcd-repair.html

Concerned Citizen said...

Hmmm, I see you have fixed the common LCD capacitor problem by soldering it ill-advised with a soldering iron. Pretty impressive, however it is extremely dangerous to perform for those who are inexperienced with LCD Monitors. Therefore, I would highly advise spending a little extra money to learn the basic SAFE techniques here: http://bit.do/dL7pj Rather than to go about using a soldering iron on potentially unstable fuses, capacitors, transformers, power ICs and in some cases even the LCD panel itself. I don't mean to be a negative nancy about your blog, but it must be said that I'd rather see someone that knows little about LCD monitors SAFELY repair their LCD monitors. Any more thoughts on the topic of safety here?